The Piedmont Virginian's Blog

Serving and Celebrating America's Historic Heart

Category: Art, Artists, and Galleries (page 1 of 24)

The Piedmont Weekend Roundup: February 26 – 28

Pouring red wine from bottle into glass with wooden wine casks on background

Fauquier County Wine Tasting & Competition at Airlie (Saturday, Warrenton). Come out and sample the wines of sixteen local vineyards and vote for your favorites in the People’s Choice Wine Competition. Delicious food pairings, prepared by the Airlie Chef, and live music. Please note that, to accommodate more visitors, this year’s wine tastings will be offered during two time periods. All tickets must be pre-purchased.

Riverside Group Show postcard-3 copy-1Art in Its Natural Habitat: An Exhibit of Paintings in a Model Home (Friday, 5-7 p.m., Charlottesville). Interior designer Robin Ellis invites you to celebrate Stony Point Design/Build as well as Charlottesville artists Helen Hillard, Chris Tucker, and Nancy Wallace.

Lighting the Creative Spark lightingthecreativespark(Thursday, Live An Artful Life Gallery, The Plains). This workshop, led by Dr. Celia Im, utilizes the power of music to ignite attendees’ creative potential. By engaging this part of ourselves, we are driven to finish that creative project, sculpt the next stage of our lives, and live in the moment.

Winemaker for a Day: Blending Seminar at Narmada Winery (Saturday, Amissville). Have you always dreamed of being a winemaker? Challenge yourself and your friends at our interactive winemaking seminar. Join our winemaker Sudha Patil and guest speaker Duane Harris for this workshop and experience the excitement of combining both the art and the science that goes into making a distinctive wine! You’ll be sampling and blending cabernet franc, malbec, merlot, cabernet sauvignon, and petit verdot. Once your perfect blend is bottled, teams compete, imbibe, and select the most spectacular wine of the day!

FB_Motown-768x284Motown & More: A Tribute to Motown and Soul Legends (Friday, State Theatre, Culpeper).  An ensemble of today’s most talented artists brings it all back! Vocalists Bryan Fox, Gene McBride, Jeffrey Walker and Shang (each phenomenal in their own right) come together with exquisite harmonies to recreate classics and develop new musical arrangements. Less than a year old, Motown & More has become a popular production in the Baltimore/Washington/Virginia region.

An Evening with Groucho (Sunday, Louisa Arts Center, Louisa). Award-winning actor Frank Ferrante reprises his New York and London hit in this fast-paced hilarious tour-de-force. You will swear legendary comedian Groucho Marx is alive and well and making you laugh. Accompanied by his pianist, the comedy, one-liners, and songs of Groucho Marx make for an all-ages treat!

Six Pack Songwriter Series: An Evening of Central Virginia Songwriting (Friday, The Paramount, Charlottesville). With the goal of allowing audiences to experience a mixture of our best local artists at once, each “Six Pack Songwriter Series” event features 6 artists for one evening of live and local music. This year’s  production welcomes an all-new lineup to The Paramount stage. This year’s roster includes Michael Clem, Ben Eppard, Paulo Franco, Julia Kwolyk, Anne O’Brien, and David Tewksbury, all backed by a live band.

National Theatre Live in HD Presents: “As You Like It” at the Paramount (Sunday, The Paramount, Charlottesville). Shakespeare’s glorious comedy of love and change comes to the National Theatre for the first time in over 30 years, with Rosalie Craig (London Road, Macbeth at MIF) as Rosalind.  With her father, the Duke, banished and in exile, Rosalind and her cousin Celia leave their lives in the court behind them and journey into the Forest of Arden. There, released from convention, Rosalind experiences the liberating rush of transformation. Disguising herself as a boy, she embraces a different way of living and falls spectacularly in love.

Smithsonian at Little Washington Concert Series: Haydn Piano Trios (Sunday, Theatre at Washington, Washington). Pianist Kenneth Slowik is an artistic director of the Smithsonian Chamber Music Society. Violinist Heather Green joined the National Symphony Orchestra in 2005, and became a member of the first violin section in 2007. Cellist James Lee made his debut with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra at the age of 15. These three come together for a marvelous performance.

2015 90th Gold Cup 1

photo by Doug Lees

“Virginia Steeplechasing: The History and Future of the Sport in the Piedmont” (Sunday, National Sporting Library, Middleburg). This steeplechasing panel discussion is mediated by Robert Banner, President of Great Meadow Foundation. Panelists are Dr. William Allison (Ex-MFH and President and Race Chairman of the Virginia Gold Cup Races), Dr. Alfred Griffin (Ex-MFH and Director of Racing of the Virginia Gold Cup), Will O’Keefe (Race Director of the Virginia Fall Races), and Don Yovanovich (President of the Virginia Point-to-Point). Panelists discuss the history and future of this region’s beloved steeplechasing and equine sports. The audience will have an opportunity to ask questions of the panelists. Also at NSLM currently are the exhibits “Side by Side with Gun and Dog” and “Line Dance: the Art of Fly Fishing.”

“Sunrise, Sunset” (Byrne Gallery, Middleburg). This weekend is the last chance to see this juried show featuring artworks inspired by sunrises and sunsets, bringing joy and warmth to the cold month of February.

“Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story” at Riverside Dinner Theater (Through Mar. 13, Fredericksburg). Starring Todd Meredith as Holly, with the Buddy Holly tribute band, The Rave-Ons, this musical is the true story of the last few years of Buddy Holly’s life, spotlighting his meteoric rise to fame from the moment in 1957 when “That’ll be the Day” hit the airwaves until his tragic death on “The Day the Music Died.” Featuring many of his timeless hits, “Buddy” is a celebration of the life and times of “the young man with the glasses” that captures the unique mixture of innocence, determination, humor, and charm that was Buddy Holly and wraps it all up into a package that has become “The World’s Most Successful Rock-n-Roll Musical.”

A Great Month for Local Art

This February features several great opportunities to see the work of local artists, all of whom capture the ineffable beauty of this region and then share it with us, adding to our understanding of this gorgeous region.

Ode to Young Hare by Trish CroseOn Friday, new exhibits open at Piedmont Virginia Community College. “Saints and Angels,” a watercolor series by Trish Crowe is inspired “by the terrain that surrounds her Madison County home, Crowe’s work depicts fields, farms and the animals within. Rendered with her signature strong lines and vibrant colors, the works evoke the energy and beauty of nature.”

Also on display is work by other artists in the “Firnew Farm Artists’ Circle,” of which Crowe is the founder and one of the 35 members in the artistic collective. The gallery features works by John Berry, Leslie Barham, Tina Wade, and many others.

Opening Reception Friday, Feb. 12, 5-7 p.m.

Next week, the 5th Annual Art of the Piedmont event features local fine art, an auction, food, drink, and entertainment. All-you-can-eat hors d’oeuvres from the Goodstone Inn and drinks sponsored by the Piedmont Fox Hounds add to a night of art appreciation and community outreach, as the event benefits Middleburg Montessori School.

 

The event takes place at the Middleburg Community Center, February 19, from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. Tickets, further information, and a full list of contributing artists and their biographies are available on the AotP’s website: artofthepiedmont.org/

Art by: Trish Crowe | Ode to a Young Hare

1796573_10202889919310186_4960203201090092007_nMorgan Hensley is a recent graduate of William & Mary where he studied English and creative writing with an emphasis on poetry. He is the Assistant Editor of the Piedmont Virginian and enjoys writing about music and the arts.

An Art Exhibition to Remind Us of Warmer Days

Line Dance

“Line Dance” by Peter Corbin

“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer,” the dour existentialist Albert Camus once wrote. This sentiment bears repeating. The heaps of snow Jonas left behind are melting, warm sunny days have mounted a counterattack, and Punxsutawney Phil recently voiced his support of an early springtime platform.

"Broad River Redfish"

“Broad River Redfish” by Peter Corbin

Together these signs point towards the coming spring. These hints are tantalizing; we close our eyes and imagine a warm breeze, only to open them and find ourselves in the car with the heat blowing out at gale-force velocities.

There is a cure for these seasonal delusions: art.

The National Sporting Library and Museum in Middleburg opened a new exhibit January 30th. “Line Dance–The Art of Fly Fishing” features the work of angler and painter Peter Corbin.

"Ligonier Point" by Peter Corbin

“Ligonier Point” by Peter Corbin

“How do you start a painting? Go fishing. Experience the awe. See the fish, the land, and the seascape. Take notes with your mind, camera, or sketch book. Gather all the information you can in every way you can,” Corbin says.

His works capture the ocean’s vibrant blues, the warmth of a cloudless sky, the excitement of reeling in a gleaming striped bass. His works show the influence of the Hudson River School, and capture the intensity of Winslow Homer’s seascapes.

For more information, check the National Sporting Library and Museum

1796573_10202889919310186_4960203201090092007_nMorgan Hensley is a recent graduate of William & Mary where he studied English and creative writing with an emphasis on poetry. He is the Assistant Editor of the Piedmont Virginian and enjoys writing about music and the arts.

Obsession in the Stream

43 years after first casting a bamboo fly rod, Douglas Graham is still chasing brookies in the Blue Ridge.

Text and photographs by Douglas Graham

United States - 080114: Fly fishing on the hawksbill creek in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. Here is a brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), is a species of fish in the salmon family of order Salmoniformes. It is native to Eastern North America in the United States and Canada. In many parts of its range, it is known as the speckled trout or squaretail. A potamodromous population in Lake Superior is known as coaster trout or, simply, as coasters. Though commonly called a trout, the brook trout is actually a char (Salvelinus).  (Douglas Graham / Wild Light Photos)

Fly fishing on the hawksbill creek in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. Here is a brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), is a species of fish in the salmon family of order Salmoniformes. It is native to Eastern North America in the United States and Canada. In many parts of its range, it is known as the speckled trout or squaretail. A potamodromous population in Lake Superior is known as coaster trout or, simply, as coasters. Though commonly called a trout, the brook trout is actually a char (Salvelinus). (Douglas Graham / Wild Light Photos)

In the fall of 1972 my grandfather loaded me up in his pickup truck and drove me from Virginia’s Tidewater region to the Blue Ridge Mountains near Luray with two split bamboo rods — and infected me with brook trout fishing on the fly. I was 12 years old.

I have not recovered from that trip in 43 years.

In the years following that fall trip so long ago, I’ve learned everything I could learn about the craft. I read every book I could find, and I learned about tying my own flies and any technique used in fly-fishing both fresh and salt water. Hundreds of books and thousands of hours on the water, it’s been a life’s pursuit and to this day a continuing education.

Somewhere in there was a career in photojournalism where I witnessed things people should never have to see. But even with that time consuming pursuit, I managed to work in fishing. It kept me grounded and sane in an otherwise insane job.

Often I’d stay an extra day after an assignment and fish the local waters. Places like the Snake River in Wyoming, where I landed my first brown trout, the Deschutes in Central Oregon for my first cutthroat, and of course when I was in Missoula, I fished the Blackfoot River.

Now retired and living slower and closer to the earth, I’ve decided there is no better fly fishing in America than what my grandfather had infected me with 40 some years ago in our backyard of the Piedmont region.

UNITED STATES - May 21: All the things needed for a day fishing for rookies in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. (Photo By Douglas Graham/WLP)

All the things needed for a day fishing for rookies in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. (Photo By Douglas Graham/WLP)

United States - 080114: Fly fishing on Cedar Creek in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia.  (Douglas Graham / Wild Light Photos)

Fly fishing on Cedar Creek in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. (Douglas Graham / Wild Light Photos)

I’ve fished a whole year from my motorcycle, logging in my fishing journal the ebb and flow of the water, the weather, the fish I’ve caught, and the seasons of Virginia. I’ve taught my wife and daughter to fish, and even an Airedale.

My obsession is now with the “squaretails” close to home; I don’t really have any desire to travel to fish. Well, OK, I’d go to Slovenia for marble trout, but for the most part I’m content with the brookies. Our storied brook trout live in one of the most beautiful places on earth, the Blue Ridge Mountains. I love that I can fish mid week on almost any stream in the Shenandoah Park and have the stream all to myself.

As far as the brookie being easy to catch, well yes, some of them are because they are basically starving on our small freestone creeks. The young fish will hit anything that moves. With that said, try and catch 11- to 14-inch brookies that lurk in our waters and see how many you land in a day! The older and larger fish are tricky and very selective. Casting and catching a big brookie in the tight confines of our little streams is perhaps one of the most fulfilling moments for me as a fly fisherman.

In this photo essay, the fish itself will reveal why this is my obsession — from the landscape that this little fish lives in to the fish itself. The brook trout out of the water has bright orange fins with a white as snow under belly. The orange lower fins have a bright white leaning edge bordered by a jet black strip and its sides are green and yellow with pale blue spots surrounding a pink center dot. It’s as if the little native fish was painted by the hand of God.

The colorful fish in the water just disappears.

The brook trout is one of many things Mother Nature has done that is just a little better than perfection.  

The Rapidan River ranks #38 in Trout Unlimited's Guide to America's 100 Best Trout Streams. In 2000, the upper Rapidan River was nominated for EPA designation as a Tier III Exceptional Waterway. The Rapidan River, flowing 88 miles (142 km) through north-central Virginia in the United States, is the largest tributary of the Rappahannock River. The two rivers converge just west of the city of Fredericksburg. The Rapidan River begins west of Doubletop Mountain seen here in Shenandoah National Park where the Mill Prong meets the Laurel Prong at Rapidan Camp, approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) south of Big Meadows. (Photo by Douglas Graham / WLP)

The Rapidan River ranks #38 in Trout Unlimited’s Guide to America’s 100 Best Trout Streams. In 2000, the upper Rapidan River was nominated for EPA designation as a Tier III Exceptional Waterway. The Rapidan River, flowing 88 miles (142 km) through north-central Virginia in the United States, is the largest tributary of the Rappahannock River. The two rivers converge just west of the city of Fredericksburg. The Rapidan River begins west of Doubletop Mountain seen here in Shenandoah National Park where the Mill Prong meets the Laurel Prong at Rapidan Camp, approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) south of Big Meadows. (Photo by Douglas Graham / WLP)

 

 The Rapidan River ranks #38 in Trout Unlimited's Guide to America's 100 Best Trout Streams. In 2000, the upper Rapidan River was nominated for EPA designation as a Tier III Exceptional Waterway. Here Campanulaceae, Cardinal Flower blooms along the banks of the lower reaches of the Rapidan. Fly-fishing on the Rapidan River is a real challenge because of spooky and well-educated fish in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. (Photo by Douglas Graham / WLP)

The Rapidan River ranks #38 in Trout Unlimited’s Guide to America’s 100 Best Trout Streams. In 2000, the upper Rapidan River was nominated for EPA designation as a Tier III Exceptional Waterway. Here Campanulaceae, Cardinal Flower blooms along the banks of the lower reaches of the Rapidan. Fly-fishing on the Rapidan River is a real challenge because of spooky and well-educated fish in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. (Photo by Douglas Graham / WLP)

 

Dawn Graham fly fishing for native brook trout on the Hughs River in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia.

Dawn Graham fly fishing for native brook trout on the Hughs River in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia.

 

UNITED STATES - May 21: A brooke trout sits on a feeding station on the Hawksbill Creek in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. The brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), is a species of fish in the salmon family of order Salmoniformes. It is native to Eastern North America in the United States and Canada. In many parts of its range, it is known as the speckled trout or squaretail. A potamodromous population in Lake Superior is known as coaster trout or, simply, as coasters. Though commonly called a trout, the brook trout is actually a char (Salvelinus). (Photo By Douglas Graham/WLP)

A brooke trout sits on a feeding station on the Hawksbill Creek in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. The brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), is a species of fish in the salmon family of order Salmoniformes. It is native to Eastern North America in the United States and Canada. In many parts of its range, it is known as the speckled trout or squaretail. A potamodromous population in Lake Superior is known as coaster trout or, simply, as coasters. Though commonly called a trout, the brook trout is actually a char (Salvelinus). (Photo By Douglas Graham/WLP)

 

Fly fishing on Dry Run in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia.

Fly fishing on Dry Run in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia.

Edible Fest in Orange this weekend…and more!

efest2015_1

By Meghan Scalea

The Orange Downtown Alliance presents its fourth annual Edible Fest on August 8th in a celebration of food and those who produce it. The day-long event features cooking demonstrations, local food vendors, kids’ activities, and artisans producing kitchen- and meal-friendly products.

Back by popular demand, but with an expanded roster, the festival features cooking demonstrations by ten guest chefs from favorite kitchens across Virginia. Audiences get close-ups of knife skills and preparation techniques with the help of overhead cameras and large flat-screen TVs projecting each chef’s handiwork. Guest chefs include those from the acclaimed Ivy Inn, Clifton Inn, the Inn at Willow Grove, and more.

New for this year is a do-it-yourself tent where attendees can talk one-on-one with experts on topics like beekeeping, growing food and preparing it, raising chickens, and other culinary topics.

The festival was designed to be more than just a place to buy cool food, according to Jeff Curtis, Executive Director of Orange Downtown Alliance. “We’re taking it to the next level with the food message. You’re talking to the people who are raising the beef or growing the vegetables. Then you’ve got the chefs telling you how to prepare the product. We complement that with the food court where you can get some food and listen to music. Then you can look at nice accessories to buy for your kitchen or dining table. So we’ve covered all aspects of finding the source, how to prepare and present it.”

Curtis notes that more attendees are traveling from Richmond and northern Virginia to learn about where their food comes from. “We’re seeing a greater appreciation from those areas of the state,” he says. “Now folks are finding their farmers’ markets — they’re buying their food and learning how to prepare it from these farmers and vendors. That’s what the spirit of the festival is all about.”

Edible Fest is August 8 from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., rain or shine. Admission for adults is $7. Children 12 and under are free. Learn more at www.ediblefest.com.


And Elsewhere in the Piedmont

Top Picks

And plenty of other happenings:


calendar-tango-black-whiteDo you have an event you’d like listed on our online and print calendar? Send us your information here

 

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